Apple Affected by Major Flaws in Computer Chips

Apple Affected by Major Flaws in Computer Chips
Apple has said that all iPhones, iPads and Mac computers are affected by two major flaws in computer chips. It emerged this week that tech companies have been racing to fix the Meltdown and Spectre bugs, that could allow hackers to steal data.

Billions of PCs, smartphones and tablets around the world are affected – Apple has now confirmed its products are too.

The firm has released some patches to mitigate the Meltdown flaw. It said there was no evidence that either vulnerability had been exploited yet, but advised downloading software only from trusted sources to avoid “malicious” apps.

Mac users have often believed that their devices and operating systems are less vulnerable to security issues than, for example Android phones or computers running Microsoft systems.

EU to Investigate Apple over Tax Affairs

EU to Investigate Apple over Tax Affairs
The European Commission is to open a formal investigation into Apple, Starbucks and Fiat in relation to tax arrangements with three EU countries. The firms’ arrangements with Ireland, the Netherlands and Luxembourg will be investigated.

Announcing the move, tax commissioner Algirdas Semeta said that “fair tax competition is essential”.

Last year, a US Senate investigation accused Ireland of giving special tax treatment to Apple.

The European Commission will look at whether the companies’ tax affairs breach EU rules on state aid. Competition Commissioner Joaquin Almunia said: “In the current context of tight public budgets, it is particularly important that large multinationals pay their fair share of taxes.”

Countries in Europe cannot allow certain firms to pay less tax than they should, Mr Almunia added.

Apple said that it had not had “any special tax deal with the Irish government”. “We have received no selective treatment from Irish officials,” the company said. “Apple is subject to the same tax laws as scores of other international companies doing business in Ireland.”

The Irish finance ministry said Apple “did not receive selective treatment and there was no ‘special tax rate deal'”. “Ireland is confident that there is no state aid rule breach in this case and we will defend all aspects vigorously,” the Department of Finance said.

Apple 1 from 1976 signed by Wozniak sells for $650,000

Apple 1 from 1976 signed by Wozniak sells for $650,000
An original Apple 1 computer from 1976 – one of only six still in working order – has sold at auction in Germany for more than 500,000 euros ($650,000).

The Apple 1 was one of the first 50 built by Apple co-founders Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak in Jobs’ parents’ garage. The computer – consisting only of a motherboard, signed by Mr Wozniak – went to an anonymous buyer from Asia.

Last year, an Apple 1 sold for 490,000 euros (£418,000; $633,000).

Only about 200 Apple 1s were ever made. About 46 remain in existence, but only six of those are still in working order.  Bob Luther, author of The First Apple, called the Apple 1 the “holy grail of collectable technology”.

The one sold at auction in the German city of Cologne on Saturday was purchased together with an original monitor, tape-player, keyboard. The documentation was signed by Steve Jobs.